Clarity

“I have always been regretting that I was not as wise as the day I was born. Not having the clear mind unobstructed by opinions and criticisms. My actions pure and unmonitored. Every action I have today, I question myself. Is it me who is making these decisions? Are these my actions that I execute? Do I even know myself anymore?

I try to remember; a time when my actions weren’t doctored by a mind that was molded by society and the people that surround me. Do I even recognize my actions anymore? Have I lost myself trying to please others? Everything seems such a blur, my actions are led by interior motives and I am left seeking a purpose. A purpose other than to please people.

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Peer Review #1

For this week’s peer review. I’m reviewing Emily’s second blog

Hi Emily,

Love this blog on Patrick White’s quote “Life is full of alternatives but no choices”. This blog and the quote sent chills down my spine, just the stark reality of all these options and alternatives but is limited and not having a choice is so profound; especially because we are raised in a ‘the world is your oyster’ environment. But in reality, it’s not as easy as that. There are so much you can do, but you’re always limited by your circumstances and individual situation. There is always a potential for so much but you’ll never be able to exhaust that potential.

In terms of grammar, the blog is pretty good, except for the paragraph that starts with Fate. There are a few errors there. “is a results” and “an fragile”. If you have a read through you should be able to detect it.

Overall, great work on the blog. Looking forward to reading more of your work.

Cheers!
Prathu

 

Respect

I believe that ‘Nature ‘ is the biggest gift that humankind has received. We are who we are because of the gifts that we have been given but also because of humankind’s resourcefulness and the will to survive any obstacle. The Native American sense of the importance of nature reminds me of the religion which I grew up in taught me. Hindu’s have a similar sense of the importance of nature, but instead of it being one almighty they see the divine in individual things. Everything is a representation of a god. And we respect or at least try to respect everything accordingly. Leading 18 years under similar circumstances to the Native American sense of the importance of nature. It has its pros and cons. Although I am not trying to claim that these in any way are the exact same, this thought came across to me during the lecture. And how two different religions that developed under two different circumstances could be so similar. It could be possibly the true human character. I cannot answer the question if living like the Native American sense of the importance of nature will make our lives more whole and meaningful because the definition of more whole and meaningful is very vague and subjective; things that I find whole and meaningful may not be the same as the third or the second person. In my opinion, religion itself is a way for people to find meaning and purpose, and the Native American’s values may also serve this purpose.